Monday, February 15, 2010

The Times writes up my Met Office discoveries

Here's a major newspaper writing about what I found in the Met Office data:

A science blogger has uncovered a catalogue of errors in Met Office records that form a central part of the scientific evidence for global warming.

The mistakes, which led to the data from a large number of weather stations being discarded or misused, had been overlooked by professional scientists and were only
discovered when the Met Office’s Hadley Centre made data publicly available in December after the “climategate” e-mail row.

Thanks, Hannah Devlin.

And here's the bit I wrote:

The history of science is filled with stories of amateur scientists who made significant contributions. In 1937 the American amateur astronomer Grote Reber built a pioneering dish-shaped radio telescope in his back garden and produced the first radio map of the sky. And in the 19th century the existence of dominant and recessive genes was described by a priest, Gregor Mendel, after years of experimentation with pea plants.

But with the advent of powerful home computers, even the humble amateur like myself can make a contribution.


Update And now the story has been picked up by Nature. And Fox News.

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