Skip to main content

POPFile v0.22.5 Released

Here are the details:

Welcome to POPFile v0.22.5

This version is a bug fix and minor feature release that's been over a
year in the making (mostly due to me being preoccupied by other
things).


NOMINATING POPFILE FOR AN AWARD

SourceForge has announced their 'Community Choice Awards' for 2007 and
is looking for nominations. If you feel that POPFile deserves such an
honour please visit the following link and nominate POPFile in the
'Best Project for Communications' category. POPFile requires multiple
nominations (i.e. as many people as possible) to get into the list of
finalists.

http://sourceforge.net/awards/cca/nomination.php?group_id=63137

Thanks!


WHAT'S CHANGED SINCE v0.22.4

1. POPFile now defaults to using SQLite2 (the Windows installer will
convert existing installations to use SQLite2).

2. Various improvements to the handling of Japanese messages and
improvements for the 'Nihongo' environment:

Performance enhancement for converting character encoding by
skipping conversion which was not needed. Fix a bug where the
wrong character set was sometimes used when the charset was not
defined in the mail header. Fix a bug where several HTML
entities caused misclassification. Avoid a warning 'uninitialized
value'. Fix a bug that the word's links in the bucket's detail
page were not url-encoded.

3. Single Message View now has a link to 'download' the message from
the message history folder.

4. Log file now indicates when an SSL connection is being made to the
mail server.

5. A number of small bug fixes to the POPFile IMAP interface.

6. Installer improvements:

Email reconfiguration no longer assumes Outlook Express is
present. Add/Remove Programs entries for POPFile now show a more
realistic estimate of the program and data size. Better support
for proxies when downloading the SSL Support files. The SSL
patches are no longer 'hard-coded', they are downloaded at
install time. This will make it easier to respond to future
changes to the SSL Support files. The Message Capture Utility
now has a Start Menu shortcut to make it easier to use the
utility. The minimal Perl has been updated to the latest
version. The installer package has been updated to make it work
better on Windows Vista (but further improvements are still
required).


WHERE TO DOWNLOAD

http://getpopfile.org/wiki/download


GETTING STARTED WITH POPFILE

An introduction to installing and using POPFile can be found in the
QuickStart guide:

http://getpopfile.org/wiki/QuickStart


SSL SUPPORT IN WINDOWS

SSL Support is offered as one of the optional components by the
installer. If the SSL Support option is selected the installer will
download the necessary files during installation.

If SSL support is not selected when installing (or upgrading) POPFile
or if the installer was unable to download all of the SSL files then
the command

setup.exe /SSL

can be used to run the installer again in a special mode which will
only add SSL support to an existing installation.


CROSS PLATFORM VERSION KNOWN ISSUES

The current version of SQLite (v3.x) is not compatible with POPFile.
You must use DBD:SQLite2 to access the database.

Users of SSL on non-Windows platforms should NOT use IO::Socket::SSL
v0.97 or v0.99. They are known to be incompatible with POPFile; v1.07
is the most recent release of IO::Socket::SSL that works correctly.


v0.22.0 RELEASE NOTES

If you are upgrading from pre-v0.22.0 please read the v0.22.0 release
notes for much more information:

http://getpopfile.org/wiki/ReleaseNotes


DONATIONS

Thank you to everyone who has clicked the Donate! button and donated
their hard earned cash to me in support of POPFile. Thank you also to
the people who have contributed their time through patches, feature
requests, bug reports, user support and translations.

http://sourceforge.net/forum/forum.php?forum_id=213876


THANKS

Big thanks to all who've contributed to POPFile over the last year.

John.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

How to write a successful blog post

First, a quick clarification of 'successful'. In this instance, I mean a blog post that receives a large number of page views. For my, little blog the most successful post ever got almost 57,000 page views. Not a lot by some other standards, but I was pretty happy about it. Looking at the top 10 blog posts (by page views) on my site, I've tried to distill some wisdom about what made them successful. Your blog posting mileage may vary. 1. Avoid using the passive voice The Microsoft Word grammar checker has probably been telling you this for years, but the passive voice excludes the people involved in your blog post. And that includes you, the author, and the reader. By using personal pronouns like I, you and we, you will include the reader in your blog post. When I first started this blog I avoid using "I" because I thought I was being narcissistic. But we all like to read about other people, people help anchor a story in reality. Without people your bl

Your last name contains invalid characters

My last name is "Graham-Cumming". But here's a typical form response when I enter it: Does the web site have any idea how rude it is to claim that my last name contains invalid characters? Clearly not. What they actually meant is: our web site will not accept that hyphen in your last name. But do they say that? No, of course not. They decide to shove in my face the claim that there's something wrong with my name. There's nothing wrong with my name, just as there's nothing wrong with someone whose first name is Jean-Marie, or someone whose last name is O'Reilly. What is wrong is that way this is being handled. If the system can't cope with non-letters and spaces it needs to say that. How about the following error message: Our system is unable to process last names that contain non-letters, please replace them with spaces. Don't blame me for having a last name that your system doesn't like, whose fault is that? Saying "Your

The Elevator Button Problem

User interface design is hard. It's hard because people perceive apparently simple things very differently. For example, take a look at this interface to an elevator: From flickr Now imagine the following situation. You are on the third floor of this building and you wish to go to the tenth. The elevator is on the fifth floor and there's an indicator that tells you where it is. Which button do you press? Most people probably say: "press up" since they want to go up. Not long ago I watched someone do the opposite and questioned them about their behavior. They said: "well the elevator is on the fifth floor and I am on the third, so I want it to come down to me". Much can be learnt about the design of user interfaces by considering this, apparently, simple interface. If you think about the elevator button problem you'll find that something so simple has hidden depths. How do people learn about elevator calling? What's the right amount of