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Showing posts from October, 2009

Der Geek Atlas

The Geek Atlas ist jetzt auch in Deutsch.


Kaufen Sie es hier.

Die lebendige Geschichte der Wissenschaften ist überall um uns herum, man muss nur wissen, wo man hinschauen muss. Mit diesem einzigartigen Reiseführer kann man 128 Orte auf der Welt kennen lernen, die für bedeutsame Ereignisse in Wissenschaft und Technik stehen. Erlebe das Foucaultsches Pendel, das in Paris schwingt; erfahre Interessantes über das größste Wissenschaftsmuseum der Welt, das "Deutsche Museum" in München; besuche einen Ableger des Newtons Apfelbaums am Trinity College in Cambridge und vieles, vieles mehr...

Jeder Ort in Der Geek-Atlas stellt eine außerordentliche Entdeckung oder Erfindung in den Mittelpunkt und befasst sich darüber hinaus auch mit den Menschen und Geschichten, die hinter diesen Erfindungen stehen. Alle Orte werden mit interessanten Fotos vorgestellt und die Themen mit zahlreichen Zeichnungen illustriert. Das Buch ist nach Ländern aufgeteilt, für alle interessanten Orte werden auch -- ne…

Some real data about JavaScript tagging on web pages

Since March of this year I've been running a private web spider looking at the number of web tags on web pages belonging to the Fortune 1000 and the top 1,000 web sites by traffic. Using the spider I've been able to see which products are deployed where, and how those products are growing or shrinking.

The web tags being tracked are those used for ad serving, web analytics, A/B testing, audience measurement and similar.

The spider captures everything about the page, including screen shots, and I'm able to drill in to see the state of a page and all its includes at the time of spidering. Here's shot of Apple with all the detail that the spider keeps.



The first interesting thing is to look at the top 1,000 web sites by traffic and see how many different tags are deployed per page. The average is 2.21, but if you exclude those that have no tags at all then the average is 3.10. Here's the distribution of number of tags against percentage of sites.


And of course, it'…

Monopoly .com Edition

I love Monopoly and have a small collection of Monopoly games from around the world. The oddest one is Monopoly .com Edition which was released in 2000.



In it the streets are replaced with '30 of today's hottest web sites'. These are: Sportsline.com and FoxSports.com, Yahoo! Geocities, Oxygen and iVillage, shockwave.com, games.com and E! Online, Priceline, Expedia, and eBay, weather.com, about.com and cnet.com, ETrade, monster.com and MarketWatch.com, Ask Jeeves, AltaVista and Lycos, and [email protected] and Yahoo! (Yes, there are only 22!)



The railway stations are replaced with telecom companies: MCI WorldCom, Nokia, Sprint and AT&T. The playing pieces are made of pewter and depict Mr Monopoly sitting at computer, the Internet Explorer Hand, a surfboard, a computer screen, a web browser, a PC, an email, a mouse and a microchip. The Mr Monopoly piece is a special token that can take any web site 'offline' making it unavailable for purchase.



The buildings are houses…