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Update list of my GNU Make articles

A reader pointed out that the GNU Make article list on by writing page is full of broken links because CM Crossroads has reorganized their site without providing backwards compatibility.

So you are faced with a choice: you could buy a copy of my book The GNU Make Book which contains all the articles (and more!), or you could use the following list (which I've newly updated):

May 2008: Usman's Law
March 2008: GNU Make user-defined functions, part 2
February 2008: GNU Make user-defined functions, part 1
December 2007: GNU Make path handling
October 2007: GMSL 1.09: A look inside the tweaks and updates
September 2007: Makefile Debugging: An introduction to remake
July 2007: GNU Make escaping: a walk on the wild side
June 2007: Painless non-recursive Make
May 2007: Atomic Rules in GNU Make
April 2007: GNU Make meets file names with spaces in them
February 2007: GNU Make's $(shell)/environment gotcha
December 2006: Makefile Optimization $(eval) and macro caching
November 2006: The pitfalls and benefits of GNU Make parallelization
October 2006: Tips and tricks from the automatic dependency generation masters
September 2006: Sorting and Searching
August 2006: Target-specific and Pattern-specific GNU Make macros
July 2006: Making directories in GNU Make
June 2006: Rebuilding when a file's checksum changes
May 2006: What's new in GNU Make 3.81
April 2006: Tracing rule execution in GNU Make
March 2006: Rebuilding when CPPFLAGS changes
February 2006: Dynamic Breakpoints in the GNU Make Debugger
December 2005: Adding set operations to GNU Make
November 2005: What's New in GMSL 1.0.2
October 2005: An Interactive GNU Make Debugger
August 2005: Makefile Assertions
July 2005: The Trouble with $(wildcard)
June 2005: GNU Make Gotcha ifndef and ?=
March 2005: The GNU Make Standard Library
February 2005: Learning GNU Make Functions with Arithmetic
January 2005: Self-documenting Makefiles
December 2004: Learning Make with the Towers of Hanoi
November 2004: Makefile Optimization $(shell) and := go together
October 2004: Makefile Debugging: Tracing Macro Values
September 2004: Setting a Makefile variable from outside the Makefile
August 2004: The Trouble with Hidden Targets
July 2004: Dumping every Makefile variable
June 2004: Printing the value of a Makefile variable

I'll update the list on my web site later.

Comments

Mike G. said…
Unfortunately, it looks like the formatting of the articles got messed up as well.

For example, the Towers of Hanoi article has all of its examples "wrapped" to one line.

Too bad, I was curious how you'd done that :)
I'll send them a note and ask them to fix that.

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