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Restored

Back on September 30, 2013 I decided to take a break from blogging and mothballed my site. Today I've restored everything.

In the intervening time I've been pretty busy with...

1. Writing a ton of blog posts for CloudFlare (and doing all the actual work that goes into those blog posts). In particular, the posts about the OpenSSL Heartbleed bug involved a lot of work.

2. Speaking at various events including Codebits in Lisbon;  GopherCon in Denver; a Many-to-Many in London; Secure 2013 in Warsaw, Virus Bulletin 2013 in Berlin and Yandex YaC in Moscow. There was also a day trip to Paris for a private conference in there somewhere.

Here's my talk from GopherCon:



3. Working on small projects like a bike light that flashes in Morse Code, a Missile Commander Switch, and an Arduino-powered Hallowe'en lantern and releasing new versions of the GNU Make Standard Library.

4. Discovering that the one true way in the gym is the way of the barbell.

Some upcoming things:

1. A revision of GNU Make Unleashed is underway to bring it up to date with GNU Make 3.82 and 4.0 and add chapters covering new topics that readers have asked me about.

2. I'll be speaking at ICANN 50Wired 2014 and dotGo 2014 later this year.

3. Plan 28 continues (despite the lack of updates to the web site) and actual work started on intepreting Babbage's Hardware Description Language on June 1. We'll blog about that.

4. Lots of exciting things at CloudFlare that I wish I could blog about today.

And, finally, I might get back to blogging here as well.



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