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The CloudFlare Internet Summit

This coming Thursday (September 15), CloudFlare is holding its second Internet Summit in San Francisco. This year, as I did last year, I will be on stage helping to moderate discussions. The summit is organized as a sequence of 'fireside chats' where one or two guests are on stage talking with someone from CloudFlare.

Guests at the summit range from policy makers, to CEOs, to technologists. The goal is to talk about major issues affecting the growth, security and performance of the Internet worldwide. But without the talking being done by pundits, journalists or investors. The people invited to the summit are leaders, thinkers and doers, not professional talkers.

Last Year

Last year, for example, the President of Estonia talked with CloudFlare CEO Matthew Prince to talk about Estonia's push to be a digital nation.


We also had Andrew Ng from Baidu and Carmen Chang from NEA sit down and talk about the relationship between CloudFlare and Silicon Valley.


I spoke with Adam Langley from Google and Richard Barnes from Mozilla to talk about security on the Internet.


And I also spent time with Andy McAfee, co-director of the MIT Initiative on the Digital Economy, and Larry Smarr, former head of the San Diego Supercomputing Center to talk about where the Internet will be in 5 years time and beyond.


This Year

Guests for 2016 include Jen Easterly, Special Assistant to the President & Senior Director for Counterterrorism, National Security Council, John Mulligan, Deputy Director, National Counterterrorism Center, Brendan Eich, President & CEO, Brave Software, John Engates, CTO, Rackspace, Peter Eckersley, Chief Computer Scientist, EFF, Brewster Kahle, Founder & Digital Librarian, Internet Archive, Ilya Grigorik, Web Performance Engineer, Google and Jana Iyengar, Software Engineer, Google QUIC.

This year I'll be discussing the future of Internet privacy, security and performance with key people from Google, Mozilla and elsewhere.

The Internet Summit is an unusual event because it brings together policy makers, business leaders, hardcore technologists, privacy advocates and more.

Oh, and it's free and open to the public.

Sign up here if you want to attend.


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